From Trabuco To Trebuchet

The Trabuco, also known across the world as the trebuchet, was an ancient siege weapon that was able to dismantle enemy fortifications by throwing massive stones at them from great distances. The weapon was a large wooden platform that held a wooden pole or pillar and has a leather strap or net attached to the end. The device either worked through a pulley system or from the building up and release of momentum.

For hundreds of years, trabuco was a feared weapon of war, and while slow, was still able to destroy years of hard work in moments, crashing down intricately constructed walls and towers in minutes and causing a defense force to literally crumble to the ground.

Read more on pt.wiktionary.org

The first Trabuco was used in Ancient China and was a quickly built battlefield weapon that two trained soldiers could operate according to youtube.com. The way the weapon worked was that two soldiers loaded the weapon, which was basically a small wooden stand with a pole attached to it. One soldier would load a stone into a sling harness on the pole and the two men would use their body weight to spin the pole until the desired speed was reached. When the pole was stopped from moving the leather sling would snap the rock from the harness and it would crash into an enemy soldier, hopefully eliminating them.

More complicated and powerful versions of the Trabuco were used in the Middle Ages. These hulking behemoths required a large crew of operators, took weeks to build, and could hurtle a multitude of heavy stones over a far distance. Unlike its predecessor, these devices were used to shatter fortresses, not individual soldiers. While they were slow and cumbersome they made up for their time to load by their power.

Both weapons were rendered obsolete by the time gunpowder was invented, and both vanished from military use. You can still find trebuchet and Trabuco today, as they are being constructed by engineers and curious military historians. These modern-day versions are not an impressive as those from the past but are still interesting to watch in motion.

Learn more about Trabuco: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/Trabuco

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